380 The 20th Century World

Physical Map of the World, 2016. Source: Central Intelligence Agency

HISTORY 380/ What is this course about?
History 380, the 20th Century World, is a 3 credit history course which i also a General Education or GE course. History 380 looks at the history of the recent past. 

For History Majors, History 380 will add 3 credits to your record, but it will not fulfill any of the other requirements for majors.

INSTRUCTOR/ Who is teaching this course?
Prof Mary Halavais: halavais@sonoma.edu. I’m a professor in the History Department. My research involves Early Modern Spain and all that it touches on. This is my 22nd year teaching at Sonoma State.

Office Zoom: Monday 7pm, Tuesday, 1 pm, Wednesday 10 am.
Email me if you have a question, or if I can help you with the course material in any way. I will respond quickly!

PROCEDURES/What should I do for this class?
This video explains how to manage the online course.
History 376 is an online, asynchronous course. Students will not attend classes; instead, class material and assignments will be available online each week in the syllabus, at mary.halavais.net.

NOTE that this course does not use Canvas.

You may access the material and complete assignments at any time within the week. The only fixed meeting times are office hours, via ZOOM, Monday at 7 pm, Tuesday at 1 pm, and Wednesday at 10 am.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/What will I learn in History 380 this semester?
History 380 is designed to provide you with both content knowledge and specific academic skills.
In terms of content you will acquire
1.familiarity with key ideas and important events
in the 20th century. You will also gain an
2.appreciation for the different sources and varied approaches
historians use in their work.
In terms of academic skills History 339 will develop your
1.critical reading ability,
since you will be answering questions about assigned reading each week. Your
2.writing and analytic skills
will improve as you work on posts and responses, and you will also begin to appreciate the importance of
3.collaboration
in academic work

GRADE/ How will I be evaluated or graded in History 380?
Your grade in the course will be based upon the following work:
15% Weekly reading questions, based on the readings, are listed in the syllabus. They are due by 11:59 PM each Sunday evening. You may submit work after this date, but you will not receive full credit. For each day an assignment is late, 15% will be deducted from your grade. Thus, to receive any credit at all, you must submit late work within one week of the due date.
15% A one-paragraph reaction to the weekly problem, posted by 11:59 PM each Sunday evening.
15% Two responses to two different reactions, posted by the following Tuesday at 1:59 PM.Your responses should offer additional examples in support of the reaction, or challenge the reaction in some way. “Good work” or “Great idea” are not responses!
25% Midterm essay exam and
30% Final essay exam Exams are essay format, and require you to cite liberally from the material you have been reading and viewing.
Cite your sources; give credit to others for their ideas.
Plagiarism in this course will result in your failing the course as a whole, in addition to whatever penalties the University imposes. Please see the University catalog.

Students with Special Needs
If you are a student with special learning needs, and you think you may require accommodations, your first step is to register with the campus office of Disabled Student Services,  707-664-2677. DSS will provide you with written confirmation of your verified disability, and authorize recommended accommodations. You then present this recommendation to
the instructor,  who will discuss the accommodations with you.

Unforeseen circumstances
While this course does not require you to attend class, it does require an internet connection. With PG&E outages, or other unforeseen events, it is possible that you may lose your internet connection. We can adapt the course to these, or other, changing conditions.

The Syllabus
History 376 should be a collaboration; students, as well as the instructor, can be involved in deciding what is important to study.  This syllabus is not set in stone! If you are interested in a particular topic and would like to learn more about it, please let me know. 

 

Schedule of Classes
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Jan 25 – Great Powers and the Road to War.

VIEW: Video lecture

Royal Irish Rifles in communications trench, Somme. Photo Q1,  Imperial War Museum.

REQUIRED READING 
“Great Power Rivalry and the World War” in International History, 6-35;

“The Search for European Stability” in International History, 35-63

Crosby, “Part II: Spanish Influenza, the first wave,“ America’s Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918 (Cambridge: Cambridge U Press, 2003), pages 17-45.

Wilson presents his 14 Points

REQUIRED VIEWING

“World War I in Photos,”  The Atlantic, April 27, 2014

British Women in World War 

The British Archives: Women at War

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Jan 31, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais @sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. 
HERE IS THIS WEEK’S THINKING QUESTION: Competition is seen, at least in some settings, as a way to improve quality and affordability, as a good thing, But it looks as if one of the root causes of WWI was competition among nations. Was this the case? IS competition a good thing in markets, or in diplomacy?
Post your response by Jan 31 at 11:59 p.m. Sign your response with your first name and last initial. Post in the posting space below my video lecture – once the video lecture appears!

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Feb 2 at 11:59 pm. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. Sign each of your comments with first name and last initial.

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Jan 31 – War and Empire Building in East Asia 

VIEW: Video lecture

OPEN VIDEO LECTURE TO LOCATE POSTING BOARD, PLEASE!

Migita Toshihide, “Surviving Chinese Generals Surrender to Japanese, Pyongyang 1894.”  Collection of Boston Fine Arts Museum.

1. REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING ASSIGNMENTS
“Japan, China and the Origins of the Pacific War” in International History, 63-84

“A Picture of Change...” NYTimes, August 7, 2020 (Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji))

1890-1895” and “1895-1900” (pages 140-146); Part IV (pages 151-167), Historical Atlas of Northeast Asia, 1590-2010 (NY: Columbia U Press,2014) 

Esherick, J., The Origins of the Boxer Uprising (Berkeley: U of California Press, 1987), chapters 7 and 8 (167-241)

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due NOTE CHANGE: TUEDAY, FEB 9 , by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais @sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. HERE IS THIS WEEK’S THINKING QUESTION: What reasons might there be for the different ways in which Japan and China reacted to European incursion in the 19th century? Post your response by NOTE CHANGR FEB 9 at 11:59 p.m. No need to sign! The board shows your name as you post.

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses  by FEB 11 at 11:59 pm.  Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. No need to sign!
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PLEASE. EXPECT TO SEE THE THINKING QUESTION AND THE VIDEO LECTURE, AND TO RECEIVE THE READING QUESTIONS, EACH MONDAY MORNING FOR THE REST OF THE SEMESTER!

Feb 7 – Colonies and Protectorates
VIEW:
Video lecture

The British Indian Empire 1909, from the Imperial Gazetteer of India

1. REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING 
“European Colonial Empires, 1900-1945″in International History, 84-115;

“The Origins of the Arab-Israeli Conflict” in International History, 115-143;

“Good Neighbors: The United States and the Americas” in International History, 143-165

The British Raj in India (BBC)

RECOMMENDED
Behm, A.,”Settler Historicism and Anti colonial Rebuttal in the British World, 1880-1920,“ Journal of World History, Vol.26, No. 4, pages 785-813.

Saada, E. “Nation and Empire in the French Context,” Sociology and Empire: The Imperial Entanglements of a Discipline (Durham, N.C.: Duke U Press, 2013) pages 321-329.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:
Philip Noyce, director :”Rabbit-Proof Fence,” 2002. You can stream this for 2.99-3.99. Excellent film, and very much on-topic for this week.

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Feb 14 , by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais @sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. HERE IS THE QUESTION: What IS colonialism? Is it fair to consider U.S. relations with Latin America to be colonialism? Why – or why not? Post your response by Feb 14 at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Feb 16 at 11:59 pm.  Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 
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Feb 14 – The 1920s and 1930s in Europe
VIEW
: Video lecture

July 1936: surrender of Republican soldiers outside of Madrid

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING
Video: “What is fascism?” World History Project.

Payne,S. 1980. Fascism, comparison and definition\
U. of Wisconsin Press. Pages 3-21.

Kirk, T and A. McElligott. 1999. Opposing Fascism: community, authority and resistance in Europe. Cambridge University Press. Please read chapter 2. Dangerous Communities and conservative Authority;  4. Spain 1936: Resistance and Revolution: and 8: Nazi Austria.

RECOMMENDED:
The Threepenny Opera.  (film) Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill created this dark anti-opera in Weimar Germany to be performed live. For us, a film will have to do.

Chaplin, The Great Dictator (1940) Highly recommended.

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Feb 21, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. HERE IS THE QUESTION: The last 4 years in the US have shown us elements of populism, authoritarianism and even fascism as defined by your three assigned sources this week. What elements demonstrate to us that the US was NONE of these in the very recent past?Please CITE YOUR SOURCES in responding to this question, and in responding to one another. Post your response by Feb 21  at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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Feb 21 -World War II in Europe
VIEW: Video lecture

Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin at Yalta, Feb. 1945
National Archive and Records Administration: NAID 541340

1. REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING
“The Second World War” in International History, 199-229

Nakamura, Barefoot Gen (FIRST HALF)

The World at War, 1931-1941,” U.S. Government film.

The Fallen of World War II

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Feb 28, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here is the question: Gen’s dad is clearly opposed to the war, in Nakamura’s graphic novel. How do you think someone who spoke out against the war in the US would have been treated? Can you provide evidence for your response?Post your response by Feb 28 at 11:59 p.m.

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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Feb 28 -WORLD WAR II IN THE PACIFIC
VIEW: 
Video lecture

The Imperial Powers in the Pacific, 1939

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING

John Hershey, Hiroshima

Nakamura, Barefoot Gen. second part

Japanese cities firebombed by US

RECOMMENDED VIEWING:
Kurosawa,Dreams, #7, “The Weeping Demon” (film)

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, March 8 by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here is the question: how do the experiences of Hershey’s individuals differ from those of the author of Barefoot Gen? Post your
response by Mar 8  at 11:59 p.m. 

Post below the video lecture – open lecture first to post.

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. Sign each of your comments with first name and last initial.

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March 8- The Cold War
This week I am posting an older lecture on the beginning of the Cold War for you. Watch for information on the midterm exam in your sonoma.edu email. Office hour tomorrow at noon – I will send a link.

VIEW: Video lecture

NATO (blue) and Warsaw Pact (red) nations 1949-1990

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING 
“The First Cold War” in International History, 229-261.

“From Cold War to Detente” in International History 285-311.

Soviet H-Bomb test

John Green’s Crash Course: “Cold War”

Menand, L.,“Joseph McCarthy and the Force of Political Falsehoods,New Yorker,  August 3&10, 2020

Nuclear Explosions, by Hashimoto

Duck and Cover, 1951 Civil Defense film

Kolbert, E. “The Day Nuclear War Almost Broke Out,”New Yorker, October 12, 2020.

RECOMMENDED:
McMahon, Robert J. The Cold War: A Very short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. (SSU Library online)

Jeremy Black. The Cold War: A Military History. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015. (SSU Library online,)

Jill Cowan. “Lessons from a California Witch Hunt,” New York Times, May 24, 2019

The Atomic Cafe, 1982 Documentary (Youtube)

1980s NATO exercise that almost started a war, in the Guardian.

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Mar 15, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here is the question: How important was nuclear power in the cold war conflict? Post your response by Mar 15  at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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Mar 15 MIDTERM EXAM WEEK
Your midterm exam is an essay of 1000 words (3 pages). You will have at least two topics, emailed on Sunday March 14, to choose from. Your essay must use citation (in-text or footnote) and you should include sources from the required and recommended reading. The essay is due to halavais@sonoma.edu by 11:59 pm, Friday, March 19.

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MAR 22 – SPRING BREAK

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WEEK 10: MAR 29 – Asia – proxy wars and the rise of the third world
VIEW: Video lecture

1954 Geneva Conference – U.S. Army Photo

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING 
“The Vietnam Wars” in International History, 311-333

“The Rise of the Third World” in International History, 333-361

Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989), “The Funeral” and Book I: Going to War.

RECOMMENDED:
Bernard B Fall, Hell in a Very Small Place. New York: Da Capo, 2002.

“Cairo Conference of Nonaligned Nations.” International Organization 19, no. 4 (1965): 1065-070. (SSU Library online)

Ajami, Fouad. “The Fate of Nonalignment.” Foreign Affairs 59, no. 2 (1980): 366-85. (SSU Library online)

film: The Killing Fields 

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading ARE NOT REQUIRED THIS WEEK.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s  question: Why do you think that historians in the U.S. have not paid more attention to the Non-Aligned Nations? Post your response by Apr 4 at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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WEEK 11: APR 5 Developmental states 
VIEW: Video lecture

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING 
Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989),  Book II: Antecedents to a Confrontation, and Book III: The Battle of Ap Bac.

Developmental States” in International History, 361-385

slide presentation: Japan as a Developmental State

For comparison, two different paths:
PRC – People’s Republic of China – slides
North Korea – slides

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday,  April 11, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here’s the question: What are the underlying assumptions of developmental theory as far as the development of democracy? How would the post-war history of East Asia have changed if we had DIFFERENT  underlying assumptions? Post your response by Apr 11 at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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WEEK 12: APR 12  – The US and Latin America
VIEW: Video lecture

Mural-Latin American Presence (Universidad de Conception, Chile)

1. REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING
Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989), Book IV: Taking on the System.

“The US and Latin America” in International History, 411-439

RECOMMENDED:
Zachary et al., “No Business like FIRC Business: Foreign-Imposed Regime Change and Bilateral Trade,” British Journal of Political Science, Vol.47, Issue 4, October 2017, 749-782

Weyland, K. “Limits of US Influence: the Promotion of Regime Change in Latin America,” Journal of Politics in Latin America, 2018-12, Vol.10 (3), 135-164

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday,  Apr 18 by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here is your question: What is the best U.S, policy in the 21st century for underdeveloped countries like those in Latin America? Why do you say that? Post your response by Apr 18 at 11:59 p.m. 

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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WEEK 13: APR 19- Africa and Decolonization
VIEW: Video lecture

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING
Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989), Book V: Antecedents to the Man.”

“Africa” in International History ,439-467

film: Battle of Algiers

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday, Apr 26, by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. Here is the question: The US has used “Battle of Algiers” as a training film for military about to be sent overseas. What do you think viewers would learn from this film? Post your response by Apr 26 at 11:59 p.m. Sign your response with your first name and last initial.

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. Sign each of your comments with first name and last initial.

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WEEK 14: APR 26- Palestine and Israel
VIEW: Video lecture

1947 United Nations Plan for Partition

1. REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING
“The Arab – Israeli Conflict” in International History, 467-501

Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989), Book VI: A Second Time Around

RECOMMENDED
United Nations: “The Question of Palestine”

2. RESPONSE to questions on videos and assigned reading, due Sunday,  May 3 by 11:59 p.m. Email to halavais@sonoma.edu.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question. The question: What is one important thing that has been overlooked in peace attempts for Palestine and Israel? Post your response by May 3 at 11:59 p.m. Sign your response with your first name and last initial.

4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. Sign each of your comments with first name and last initial.

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WEEK 15: MAY 3 – Islam as a Political Force
VIEW: Weekly Problem Responses

1.REQUIRED READING AND VIEWING 
“The Rise of Political Islam” in International History, 501-529

Sheehan, Neil, A Bright Shining Lie (New York: Vintage, 1989), Book VII: John Vann Stays

RECOMMENDED READING
Ayoob and Lassier, The Many Faces of Political Islam (U Michigan Press, 2020) Chapter 7.

Al-Kadi, “Between Foreign Policy and the Umma: The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and Jordan,” Muslim World. Jul2019, Vol. 109 Issue 3, p240-260. 21p.

2. NO reading questions this week.

3. WRITTEN WORK: Write a one paragraph response to the week’s question: Has Islam always been political, or is contemporary political Islam a newer movement? Post your response by May 10  at 11:59 p.m. 
4. COMMENTARY: Post a one-sentence comment to each of two of the posted responses by Tuesday. Once a post has 2 responses below it, you must choose another posted response to comment on. 

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WEEK 16: MAY 10 
Your chance to show that you can think like a historian! Final exam prompt or prompts will be emailed out on Sunday evening, with directions.

MAY 17 FINAL EXAMINATION WEEK
Your final exam is due Wednesday May 19th by 11:59 p.m. to halavais@sonoma.edu.

 

One Reply to “380 The 20th Century World”

  1. The film “Battle of Algiers,” by Gillo Pintercorvo, shows us the Algerian liberation from the French. This film has been used by the United States military to train troops who are going to be deployed overseas. The United States military had been facing similar war situations that the French had faced on multiple occasions which is why the film was deemed useful to the United States. It was meant to teach the troops about common counterinsurgency tactics. Torture was a big tactic utilized by the French, and while it was legal in some countries, it also led to the French losing support because of the acts. To me, it shows that the ends do not always justify the means.

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